Questions Basic Rules

June 19th, 2010 in English Grammar, English Learning

The following rules apply to almost all written questions.

Auxiliary verb before subject

In a question the auxiliary verb normally comes before the subject.

Adjective clauses Exercise 1

June 17th, 2010 in Improve English

Combine each of the following pairs of simple sentences into one complex sentence containing an adjective clause.

1. The theft was committed last night. The police has caught the man.

As…as; as much/many …as

June 14th, 2010 in English Grammar, English Learning

The structure as…as… is used to say that people or things are equal in some way.

Should, ought and must

June 13th, 2010 in English Grammar, English Learning

Should and ought have very similar meanings. In fact, they can often replace each other.

We should work hard, shouldn’t we? OR We ought to work hard, shouldn’t we?

Difference between some and any

June 12th, 2010 in English Grammar, English Learning

Both some and any are used to refer to an indefinite quantity or number. They are used when it is not easy or necessary to say exactly how much/many we are thinking of.

Question tags – advanced points

June 11th, 2010 in English Grammar, English Learning

Aren’t I?

The question tag for I am is aren’t I, not amn’t I.

I am late, aren’t I? (NOT I am late, amn’t I?)

Imperative sentences

Correct use of think

June 9th, 2010 in English Grammar, English Learning

To think about something is to have an opinion about something. When think is used to talk about opinions, we do not normally use progressive verb forms.
What do you think of his latest film? (NOT What are you thinking of his latest film?)
Who do you think did this? (NOT Who are you thinking did this?)