Archive for April, 2010

At, in, on and to

April 30th, 2010 in Improve English

At, in and to

We use at and in to talk about position. To is used to talk about direction or movement.

Grammar Terms Beginning with Letter I – Part III

April 28th, 2010 in English Grammar, English Learning

Interjection
A word or phrase which expresses emotion and does not form part of a sentence. English examples include Damn!, Ouch!, My Goodness!, Alas!, Hurrah!

Grammar Terms Beginning with Letter I – Part II

April 27th, 2010 in English Grammar, English Learning

Indicative
The label indicative refers to the mood category associated with an ordinary statement.

The cat is chasing the mouse.
She is working in the garden.
Oil is not soluble in water.
I will be back shortly.

Grammar Terms Beginning with Letter I – Part I

April 26th, 2010 in English Grammar, English Learning

Idiom

An idiom is a fixed expression the meaning of which is not guessable from the meanings of the words in it. Examples include ‘kick the bucket’ (die) and ‘let the cat out of a bag’ (reveal a secret).
Imperative

Grammar Terms Beginning With Letter H

April 25th, 2010 in English Grammar, English Learning

Headline language
The special variety of language used in writing newspaper headlines.

Examples are:
President to visit India (The President is going to visit India.)
Senator denies misconduct (The Senator has denied misconduct.)

Grammar Terms Beginning With Letter G

April 24th, 2010 in English Grammar, English Learning

Gerund
A gerund is a verb form which acts like a noun. In English, the gerund ends in –ing. A gerund does have some verbal properties but it turns the entire verb phrase containing it into a noun phrase. Consider the verb read and consider the example ‘I like reading short stories’. Here reading is the gerund form of the verb read. By taking the object ‘short stories’ it exhibits verbal properties. Here the entire verb phrase (a phrase containing a verb) ‘reading short stories’ is a noun phrase functioning as the object of the verb ‘like’.

More on Degree and Degree Modifiers

April 23rd, 2010 in English Grammar, English Learning

English adjectives and adverbs usually distinguish three degrees – the positive, the comparative and the superlative. An adjective or adverb in its base form is in the positive degree. Comparative adjectives and adverbs are used to express a higher degree than that is present in something else. The superlative adjectives and adverbs express a maximal degree.