Position of Frequency Adverbs

November 29th, 2009 in English Grammar, English Learning, ESL, Improve English

Frequency adverbs tell how often something happens. Examples are: often, never, always, sometimes, generally, usually, seldom, rarely, hardly, ever, frequently etc.

Position of Frequency Adverbs

More on Subject and Object Complements

November 28th, 2009 in English Grammar, English Learning, ESL, Improve English

Subject Complement

Read the sentences given below:

The Predicate

November 28th, 2009 in English Grammar, English Learning, ESL, Improve English

That part of the sentence which does not include the subject is called the predicate.

The Subject

November 28th, 2009 in English Grammar, English Learning, ESL, Improve English

An English sentence must have at least one subject and one predicate. The subject denotes the person or thing about which something is said.
The subject is usually the first noun or noun phrase in a sentence and it represents the thing that the rest of the sentence is about. The subject may consist of one word or several words but it must still have a noun or pronoun it. The main word in the subject is called the subject-word.

Anomalous Finites – Part III

November 26th, 2009 in English Grammar, English Learning, ESL, Improve English

To emphasize an affirmative statement

The anomalous finites do, does and did can be placed before the verb to show emphasis. Note that after do, does and did, we use a verb in its present tense form.

Anomalous Finites – Part II

November 26th, 2009 in English Grammar, English Learning, ESL, Improve English

Verbs in the simple present and simple past tense do not consist of auxiliary verbs. Their negatives are made by the addition of the anomalous finites do not, does not or did not before the main verb.

Anomalous Finites – Part I

November 26th, 2009 in English Grammar, English Learning, ESL, Improve English

The term anomalous finites is used to refer to the group of 24 finites given below: