Kinds of Adverbs

November 21st, 2009 in English Grammar, English Learning, ESL, Improve English

There are three kinds of adverbs – Simple, Interrogative and Relative. The vast majority of adverbs belong to the first group; there are very few adverbs of the second and third types.

Correct Use of Some Conjunctions

November 21st, 2009 in English Grammar, English Learning, ESL, Improve English

While

While is a subordinating conjunction. It usually introduces subordinating clauses of time. But sometimes while also expresses contrast.

Correlative Conjunctions – Part II

November 20th, 2009 in English Grammar, English Learning, ESL, Improve English

Such…as

It wasn’t such a pleasant journey as we thought it would be.
She is not such a fool as you think her to be.

No sooner … than

Correlative Conjunctions

November 20th, 2009 in English Grammar, English Learning, ESL, Improve English

Conjunctions which are always used in pairs are called correlative conjunctions. Note that most correlative conjunctions are of the coordinating type.

Examples are: either…or, neither…nor, not only…but also…, not…but, though…yet, both…and, so…that etc.

Subordinating Conjunctions

November 19th, 2009 in English Grammar, English Learning, ESL, Improve English

A subordinating conjunction joins a subordinate clause and a main (principal) clause. The subordinate clause can be a noun clause or an adverb clause. Note that a subordinating conjunction is not used to connect an adjective clause to another clause.

Kinds of Conjunctions

November 19th, 2009 in English Grammar, English Learning, ESL, Improve English

There are two main kinds of conjunctions:

Coordinating conjunctions
Subordinating conjunctions

Coordinating conjunctions join two clauses or sentences of equal rank. Here both clauses are capable of being principal clauses if they appear as such in separate sentences.

More on Conjunctions

November 19th, 2009 in English Grammar, English Learning, ESL, Improve English

A conjunction is a word which merely joins two words, clauses or sentences. Note that a conjunction does not modify or qualify the words/clauses/sentences it joins.