Formation of Negative Sentences – Part II

November 12th, 2009 in English Grammar, English Learning, ESL, Improve English

Present continuous tense

Sentences in the present continuous tense have the following structure:

Subject + is/am/are + -ing form of the verb

Formation of Negative Sentences – Part I

November 11th, 2009 in English Grammar, English Learning, ESL, Improve English

Simple present

In order to change an affirmative sentence in the simple present tense into a negative sentence, we use do not or does not before the principal verb. Note that do is used with I, you and plural subjects. Does is used with singular subjects.

Interrogative Sentences – Part IV

November 11th, 2009 in English Grammar, English Learning, ESL, Improve English

Simple Future Tense

Sentences in the simple future tense have the following structure:

Subject + will/shall + present tense form of the verb

Formation of Interrogative Sentences – Part III

November 11th, 2009 in English Grammar, English Learning, ESL, Improve English

Simple past

The simple past tense has the following structure:

Subject + past tense form of the verb.

Spelling Rules – Part III

November 10th, 2009 in Words, Writing

Rule 7

‘dis’ and ‘mis’

Never double the ‘s’ of these prefixes. When a second ‘s’ occurs, it is the first letter of the next syllable.

So we have

Spelling Rules – Part II

November 10th, 2009 in Words, Writing

Rule 2

Short monosyllables always double their final consonant.

Shop, shopping (NOT shoping)
Let, letting (NOT leting)

Rule 3

‘ie’ and ‘ei’

Some Useful Spelling Rules – Part I

November 10th, 2009 in Words, Writing

English is said to have one of the most difficult spelling systems in the world. There are several reasons for this. 1) The pronunciation of many words has changed over the years, but not their spellings. For example, the ‘k’ in ‘knife’ and ‘gh’ in ‘right’ were pronounced during the Middle English Period (12th to 15th century). 2) Vowels have also changed their pronunciation over the years. 3) The spellings of many words have changed but not their pronunciation. For instance, the word ‘doubt’ used to be pronounced as ‘doute’. The ‘b’ was later inserted because the word had its origin in the Latin word ‘dubitare’ which had ‘b’ in it.